Room for the Sacred?

A recent article in The American Spectator asks the question: Is there still room for the sacred in the city?[1] Exactly what role does a church play in the everyday affairs of any community? Perhaps a definition might help. Church is not simply a building, a piece of architecture, though there are many examples of beautiful buildings called ‘churches.’ Church is merely a word identifying a community of believers, people who share a common faith and a common way of worship and expression. Church is simply a community in the midst of a community.

So, is there room in a secular community for a gathering a people who have faith? What about for people who claim to have faith in God as expressed throughout the Bible? What about a community who believes that Jesus meant what He said when He said that He was the only way to the Father (see John 14:6)?

Matthew M. Robare cites a study done in Philadelphia estimating that “religious congregations contribute over $100 million to their community annually.” This value includes social services such as food banks, warming centers, clothing donations, and soup kitchens. In a world where state supported social services struggle to keep up these services are invaluable. But are these communities of faith merely present to fill in the gaps that federal, state, county, and city services cannot provide?

What happens when a faith community is no longer able to provide the financial and physical assistance to maintain a building? What happens when property once occupied by a faith community is turned into apartments and shops? What happens to those services that could have been provided?

I have no definitive answers to the questions posed. Other authors (see recently published David Fitch, Faithful Presence, IVP Books; Jonathan Leeman, Political Cbhurch, IVP Academic, and I’m sure there are dozens of others as well) are writing seeking to answer these questions.

Is there room for the sacred? Before a ‘church’ can be present in a community individuals need to be alert and aware of God’s presence in their own lives. Making room for the sacred is not easily done, it is not the result of a 5 – 7 minute ‘quiet time’ every morning. Making room for God’s presence in our lives requires a disciplined approach to waiting on God, nourishing our heart and mind with His Word, silence, and taking the time necessary to attune our hearts and minds to Him.

As a group of individuals come together – people who have spent time individually making room for God – we share our lives, we surrender to the authority of God’s Word, we seek to understand and apply God’s Word in the community in which we live. Then those living around us, those sharing our community, can truly begin to understand that there is room for the sacred, there is a place for God’s people to be God’s hands, God’s heart to the community.

[1] Matthew M. Robare, From Chapels to Condos, The American Conservative, January/February 2017, 6-following.

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